Recent Instructors and Guest Speakers

We pull from this talented pool of instructors whenever their schedules permit.  

They may not be able to participate every year, but we are proud to have each of these talented instructors and speakers at Hog Island whenever their schedule permits. For current instructors, please click here:

Jonathan Alderfer


Artist, author, and editor Jonathan Alderfer is National Geographic’s resident birding expert. He has worked as a freelance artist and illustrator since studying art at Cooper Union in New York City, and began painting birds in the 1980s. Jonathan’s illustrations have appeared in dozens of birding books and magazines, and his fine art bird paintings and woodblock prints have been exhibited in numerous galleries and museums in North America. He has authored, edited, or illustrated over twenty books for the National Geographic Society, including Field Guide to the Birds of North America, Birding Essentials, Backyard Guide to the Birds of North America, Kids Bird Guide of North America and most recently the 2nd edition of Complete Birds of North America. Jonathan is an avid birder and passionate about teaching how to draw birds to all ages and skill levels. His other interests include art history, fly-fishing, gardening, and foraging for wild foods. Jonathan lives, paints, and watches birds in Washington, D.C., but is planning to become a year-round Maine resident in the near future. See his work at

Tom Auer - Breaking Into Birding

Tom Auer has been birding for over almost 20 years, since his spark was lit as a teenager while on a winter birding trip in Michigan's Upper Peninsula with his parents. Since then, he's pursued birds as a passion and Geographic Information Science as a career, now blending the two as a GIS Developer for the eBird Team at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Previously, Tom worked as a Conservation Data Specialist as part of the National Audubon Society Science Division and, during this time, visited and fell for the beauty of Hog Island. Tom's birding exploits include working on the Michigan Breeding Bird Atlas, surveying migrants along the Colorado River, counting waterbirds at Whitefish Point, banding passerines in Massachusetts, and surveying seabirds on the Atlantic Ocean. He's always eBirding and has been an eBird Hotspot Editor for many states.

Seth Benz


Seth has amassed nearly 30 years of experience in conservation science and environmental education leadership. He has guided Road Scholar birding trips in Maine, directed Hog Island Audubon Camp (1999-2008), worked as an island supervisor for Project Puffin, served as Education Director of the Audubon Expedition Institute and as Assistant Curator of Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Pennsylvania. He is now the director of the Schoodic Bird Ecology Lab, a collaborative field station focused on bird migration, phenology studies, and public participation in scientific research at Acadia National Park. His hands-on work includes raptor and songbird migration research, hawk watching, tern restoration efforts, bird flight altitude and wind energy studies, telemetry of wintering bald eagles, catching migratory peregrine falcons at Assateague Island National Seashore, next box monitoring projects with American kestrel, eastern screech owl, and eastern bluebird, and, ecotourism scouting trips to Peru and Mexico. Seth has held appointments as a board member of the Mid-coast Maine Audubon Chapter, and is currently the Christmas Bird Count Compiler for North Penobscot Bay, Ma

Rob Bierregaard


Rob’s passion in the natural world has always been birds of prey. He was an avid falconer when he was in graduate school. His Ph.D. research addressed the importance of competition in the ecological structure of raptor communities and got him out to the high plains of Montana for two springs.  From 1995 to 2011, Rob taught Ornithology and Ecology in the Biology Department of UNC-Charlotte. Previously (1978-1988), Rob was the original field director of the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project in Manaus, Brazil. While running the project for 8 years, he and his students collected data from over 50,000 mist-net captures of understory birds in continuous and fragmented rainforest habitat.  Rob and his graduate students carried out a 10-year study of the flourishing Barred Owl populations around Charlotte, NC. He now focuses his research on the ecology and migration of Ospreys in eastern North America. He has deployed satellite or cell-tower transmitters on 45 juvenile and 34 adult Ospreys and spends most of his time watching his flock of Ospreys (24 birds started south in the fall of 2013) move back and forth between North and South America. In 2011 he moved from Charlotte to Wynnewood, PA, where he is now a research associate of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.

Olivia Bouler


"11 years old and willing to help" is how Olivia described herself to the Audubon Society when she contacted them about the tragedy in the Gulf. Aspiring ornithologist, artist, and saxophone player, Olivia wept when she heard about the oil spill in the Gulf Coast, a place where she spent many vacations with her cousins and grandparents who live in Louisiana and Alabama. Knowing birds were going to suffer, she had to take action. Inspired by her hero James Audubon, Olivia wrote to the Audubon Society about her fundraising idea, using her talent as an artist to give bird drawings to those who donated to wildlife recovery efforts. Olivia drew and donated 500 original drawings and thousands of limited edition prints throughout the summer of 2010.

David Owen Brown


David Brown works worldwide as a producer, videographer, photographer and lecturer specializing in marine wildlife and issues.  He holds degrees from Cornell University and the Brooks Institute of Photography. His work has aired on NBC, CBS, ABC, CNN, the Discovery Channel and National Geographic television. His award-winning photography has appeared in numerous exhibits and publications, including imagery for the Smithsonian's Ocean Planet and Ocean Hall, and the American Museum of Natural History’s Water display. He has authored a variety of articles, two children's books, and was as a consultant for National Geographic’s "The World's Wild Shores."  As a member of the Cousteau team, David participated in filming expeditions with the vessels Calypso and Alcyone for seven years, exploring above and below water environments from Papua New Guinea to Alaska. He also represented the Cousteau Society lecturing on ocean subjects to universities, trade associations and aboard cruise vessels around the world. From 2002-2007,David worked for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Macaulay Library, capturing high definition footage of a wide range of birds.

Kurt Budliger


Kurt Budliger is a full-time professional photographer specializing in landscape, outdoor lifestyle and fly-fishing photography.  He is a frequent contributor to Vermont Life Magazine and Eastern Fly Fishing and works with a variety of other editorial, commercial, and conservation non-profit clients throughout the year. His fine art prints of the Vermont and New England landscape can be found in many private collections around the country.  Kurt teaches several digital photography classes at Vermont State Colleges and is the founder and lead instructor at Green Mountain Photographic Workshops.  Kurt’s commitment to conservation and education has guided his career since the beginning.  Prior to becoming a professional photographer Kurt received a BS from Colorado State University in Natural Resources with a concentration in Interpretation and later a MS in Teaching from Plattsburgh State.  He spent many years working as an environmental educator and most recently middle school science teacher in central Vermont.  Kurt Budliger Photography is a proud member and supported of 1% for the Planet. When he’s not out photographing, teaching, hiking, biking or fly-fishing he can be found spending time with his wife and two small children in central Vermont. To see more of Kurt's work please visit

Mike Burger

Mike Burger is the Director of Conservation & Science for Audubon's New York State program and helps coordinate Audubon’s Atlantic Flyway to increase collaboration and conservation success across the Audubon network in eastern states and into Central and South America.  He earned a doctoral degree in Natural Resources and Environment from the University of Michigan and has co-authored several publications on wildlife management and conservation, including Important Bird Areas of New York and a landowners’ guide to forest management.  Mike’s department administers several of Audubon’s conservation program, including the Important Bird Areas, forest stewardship, Long Island Bird Conservation, grassland, and private lands programs.  Currently he is studying migrating birds that pass through the Great Lakes Basin.

Lynne Cherry


Lynne Cherry is an author, illustrator, filmmaker and environmental lecturer. She has written and illustrated over thirty award-winning books for children inspired by her own deep reverence for the natural world.  Her best-selling books, The Greak Kapok Tree and A River Ran Wild,  teach children a respect for the earth, and have sold over a million copies that  have been translated into many languages. Lynne is also the producer and director of seven short movies, including Young Voices on Climate Changewhich tells the stories of young people who have reduced the carbon footprint of their homes, schools, communities and states. Lynne’s movies have been screened at museums and conferences including The American Museum of Natural History, the Environmental Conference of the American Bar Association, and The Association of Science and Technology Museums. Lynne earned an art degree at Tyler School of Art and an MS in History at Yale University. She was a recipient of the Metcalf Fellowship and has received science writing fellowships from the Marine Biological Lab and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. How We Know What We Know about Our Changing Climate, co-authored with photojournalist Gary Braasch, won the AAAS/ Subaru Award. Lynne lectures widely—and passionately--about how children can make a difference.

Benjamin Clock -  Arts & Birding

Fred Dietrich of Tallahassee, Florida, is a licensed hummingbird bander who has studied wintering hummingbirds in Florida and Georgia since 2009. He has banded migrant songbirds in Alabama for the past 13 years, and is the hummingbird bander trainer for the Southeast, conducting training sessions each summer in West Virginia. One of his most notable accomplishments was banding a rufous hummingbird in Florida that was recaptured five months and 3,523 miles later in Alaska. 

Adam DiNouvo -  Fall Seabird Conservation & Biology Instructor

Adam DiNuovo has been working with shorebirds and seabirds on the East and West Coasts and Gulf of Mexico for fifteen years.  He is currently a biologist for Audubon Florida and is the Collier Shorebird Monitoring and Stewardship Program Manager.  Prior to his work in Florida he was a Research Coordinator for the Institute for Conservation Research at the San Diego Zoo and served as Assistant Sanctuary Manager for Project Puffin for three years.  This will be Adam’s fourth fall as an instructor on Hog Island.

Pete Dunne


Pete Dunne is Director of the Cape May Bird Observatory, Vice President of the New Jersey Audubon Society Natural History Information and founder of the World Series of Birding. Pete is a well known author and co-author of numerous books about birds and birding including Hawks in Flight , Pete Dunne on Birding , Pete Dunne’s Essential Field Guide Companion  and The Art of Pishing . He is a regular columnist in a number of birding publications such as American Birds, Birding , Living Bird, Birder’s World  and WildBird . Best known for his skills as a hawk watcher, he is equally fascinated by shorebirds and songbirds. Pete has been leading workshops and tours for nearly 30 years and he delights in sharing with others his knowledge and passion for birds.

Richard Eakin


Richard is a retired college biology professor with a 30-year academic career at Westbrook College (Portland, ME) and the University of New England (Biddeford, ME). Rich earned his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Maine, and for over 40 years his research has focused on the biodiversity and taxonomy of Antarctic fishes. He has described over a dozen new species of these fishes and continues to participate in international research trips to collect fishes and invertebrates from sub-Antarctic habitats. Rich led field trips for the Maine Audubon Society for many years and taught bird courses for Elderhostel, College of the Atlantic, Institute for Field Ornithology, and at the Audubon Camp on Hog Island. In retirement, Rich enjoys travelling the world in pursuit of birds and living on an 80-acre wildlife sanctuary in northwestern Pennsylvania, where he monitors the birdlife and continues his lifelong passions of natural history art and photography.

Lang Elliott


Lang Elliott’s numerous audio compact discs and books featuring the sounds of nature have been purchased and enjoyed by at least a quarter million people. Lang authored, mastered, and provided most of the field recordings for the well-known Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, Eastern Region and provided field recordings and photographs for books accompanied by audio compact dics, including Common Birds and Their SongsMusic of the Birds: A Celebration of Bird SongThe Songs of Wild BirdsThe Songs of Insects and, most recently, The Frogs and Toads of North America. In addition to his own productions, Lang recently organized a world-class collection of bird song and call recordings made by himself and several partner-recordists. These recordings are featured on his new BirdTunes iPhone application, the Sibley Guide to Birds  iPhone app, the website and iPhone app, and in the new Smithsonian Field Guide to the Birds.  Lang is also the inventor of the SongFinder, a listening device aimed at bird enthusiasts who are unable to hear high-pitched bird songs (it works by lowering the frequency of high-pitched songs into a range where the user has normal or near-normal hearing). Over the last two years, Lang has jumped headlong into digital cinematography. A wealth of his high definition footage of singing birds, frogs and insects is featured on his web site

Laura Erickson


Laura is an award-winning author, conservationist, and educator. While serving as science editor at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, she wrote The Bird Watching Answer Book and some of the content and species accounts for the Lab’s All About Birds website. Since 1986, she’s been producing the country’s longest-running radio program about birds, “For the Birds,” which airs on community and public stations from Oregon to New York and is podcast on iTunes. This unpaid labor of love allows Laura to share her passion for birds far and wide. She is a contributing editor at BirdWatching magazine and serves as the American Robin Expert for the popular Journey North educational website. She was a winner in the American Ornithologists’ Union’s bird-calling contest, in the repertoire category, for her owl calls. In 2014 Laura became the first woman to receive the American Birding Association's Roger Tory Peterson Award. 

Jennifer Fee


Jennifer Fee is the Manager of K-12 Programs at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology where she has worked since 2004.  Her primary responsibility is leading the BirdSleuth program, a suite of curricula that brings the Lab’s citizen science programs to young people. While BirdSleuth was conceived as a curriculum for middle school classrooms, it has recently expanded into homeschools, camps, after-school programs, and is now being translated for use in Latin America. In addition, she shares the BirdSleuth curriculum and citizen science with teachers through online and in-person professional development workshops. Prior to joining the Lab, Jennifer worked at the Missouri Botanical Garden administering the “Partners for Growing Discovery Units” curriculum. She graduated from the Biology programs at Truman State University and Illinois State University in the Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics program. Jennifer enjoys the outdoors, especially camping, biking and hiking, and is always ready to travel and discover a new place!


Peggy Friar - Maine Seabird Biology and Conservation

Peggy Friar is on the teaching faculty in the Biology Department of the University of New England.  Her current courses include introductory biology, ornithology, comparative vertebrate anatomy, and an upper-division seminar in animal social systems. Raised on the coast of Maine, Peggy has had a longtime interest in marine biology and ecology, particularly shore and seabirds.  This developed into a strong interest in the behavioral ecology of seabirds, which she has been studying for over twenty years.  She has been assisting Project Puffin since returning to Maine in 2005. Peggy's recent research interest involves gulls.  Currently, she and a colleague are comparing an urban population of roof-nesting Herring Gulls to non-urban populations.  Peggy particularly enjoys involving her undergraduate students in hands-on field work. Studying under Ken Able in the Division of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Peggy earned her PhD from the State University of New York at Albany.  Her doctoral research was in the area of seabird behavior and focused on adoption behavior in Common Terns.  She conducted her field research in a major tern colony on an island in Buzzards Bay

Don Freiday - Joy of Birding

Dr. Frank Gill is one of the most distinguished ornithologists in the world. He recently retired as the National Audubon Society's chief scientist and interim president and CEO, having come to Audubon after 25 years at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. He is a past president of the American Ornithologist's Union, and his published works include his acclaimed textbook, "Ornithology," and more than 150 scientific and popular articles. His worldwide research programs included pioneering field studies of island birds, hybridization by blue-winged and golden-winged warblers, flower-feeding strategies of sunbirds of Africa and of hermit hummingbirds of Middle America, and phylogeny through DNA of the chickadees of the world.  For his outstanding contributions to ornithology, Frank received the AOU's William Brewster Medal in 1998. He led and directed the encyclopedic "Birds of North America" series; championed the nationwide Important Bird Areas initiative at Audubon in partnership with BirdLife International; pioneered “cyberbirding” --the use of the internet for nationwide citizen science initiatives; created the Great Backyard Bird Count and eBird initiatives of Audubon and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology; and founded Visual Resources for Ornithology (VIREO), the premier collection of bird photographs.

Ted Gilman


Ted Gilman is a naturalist and environmental educator at Audubon Greenwich, where he has inspired a love of nature in generations of children and helped train educators from across the country. Ted received his bachelors degree in Biology from Earlham College and did graduate work in Science and Environmental Education at Cornell University. He has led Audubon trips to Trinidad & Tobago and Kenya, as well as served as an education volunteer for the International Crane Foundation in northern China. Ted began teaching on Hog Island in 1974 and has returned over the past four decades to serve as an instructor for ornithology and family camp programs.

Melissa Groo


Melissa Groo is a nature photographer whose passion for photography, wildlife, and conservation drives her to tell stories and educate people about the marvels of the natural world through her images. She finds herself at the intersection of photography as fine art with the power of images to convey feeling and instruction. Melissa has received awards in national and international photography competitions. She exhibits regularly and her prints are in personal collections all over the country. Her photographs have been published in numerous books and magazines. Her photographs of the great Sandhill Crane migration in Nebraska were featured in the March 2014 issue of Smithsonian Magazine, and an upcoming issue of the magazine will showcase her photos of the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. Melissa has a Master's in Education from Stanford University, and conducts workshops and gives talks worldwide. She lives in Ithaca, New York. To view her work, please visit her website at

Anthony Hill - Hands-on Bird Science

Anthony Hill came to Hog Island in 1995 as a Field Ornithology camper. At that session, he saw a banding demonstration by Sara Morris and heard a talk about Project Puffin by Steve Kress. As a result, he became fascinated with both songbird banding and the Seabird Restoration Project (Project Puffin) and immersed himself in both activities. Anthony is now the oldest and longest-serving Project Puffin volunteer and has spent time on Eastern Egg Rock, Stratton Island, Matinicus Rock and Seal Island (his favorite). Since 1995, Anthony has also been a regular spring and fall volunteer at Sara Morris' migration banding station on Appledore Island, Maine. He now holds a master bander permit (including hummingbirds) and is certified as a trainer for passerines and hummingbirds by the North American Banding Council (NABC), for which he also serves as chair of the certification committee. His personal research is focused on wintering hummingbirds in New England, migrating northern saw-whet owls and breeding American kestrels in the Connecticut Valley of Massachusetts where he lives. He has begun training to help as a collaborating bander with Project SNOWstorm. Anthony retired from a career in medical microbiology in 2010 and served as a Navy hospital corpsman with the Marines in Vietnam from 1968-1970.

Phillip Hoose


Phillip is the widely-acclaimed author of books, essays, stories, songs, and articles, including the multi-award winning title,The Race to Save the Lord God Bird, and the Christopher Award-winning manual for youth activism It’s Our World Too!.  A graduate of the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Hoose has been a staff member of The Nature Conservancy since 1977, dedicated to preserving the plants, animals and natural communities of the Earth by protecting the lands and waters they need to survive.  A songwriter and performing musician, Phillip Hoose is a founding member of the Children’s Music Network and a member of the band Chipped Enamel. He lives in Portland, Maine.


Tom Johnson - Raptor Rapture

Tom Johnson is a recent graduate of Cornell University who spends almost all of his time pursuing birds, occasionally forgoing food and sleep. Birding from a young age, Tom has participated in programs at Hog Island as both a student and an instructor. Since graduating college, he has been exploring various methods of tricking others into paying for his birding adventures. Recently, Tom has enjoyed surveying birds on National Park Service lands in Arizona, counting seabirds and mammals for NOAA in the Gulf Stream, and monitoring fall songbird migration at Cape May, NJ. In addition to serving on two state bird records committees, Tom writes for several birding and ornithological publications. He loves to learn something new whenever he steps outside, and is particularly thrilled to return to Maine and Hog Island.

Phil Kahler - Sharing Nature: An Educator's Week


Phil Kahler has been watching birds with his middle school students at Tualatin Valley Academy in Oregon since 1994 when his students and their parents constructed a bird feeding station.  Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s BirdSleuth curriculum is a big part of his approach to teaching scientific inquiry.  He co-instructed the distance-learning course, BirdSleuth: Supporting Student Inquiry and most recently assisted participants of the 2014 Educator Academy in the Amazon Rainforest with eBird citizen science data collection.  One of the highlights of Phil’s teaching career has been taking high school students on their annual 3-day marine biology trip to the Oregon coast.  He is an alumnus of the National Audubon Society Expedition Institute and received his B.S. in Environmental Education from Lesley University.  He earned an M.S. in Environmental Education and Interpretive Services Administration from Aurora University.  As a kid he fell in love with the outdoors during family backpack trips in the Sierra Mountains of California.  Phil enjoys backyard beekeeping and photography.  


Kenn Kaufman


Kenn Kaufman is the originator of the Kaufman Field Guide series and author of Lives of North American Birds Kingbird Highway , and Flights Against the Sunset , among other books. Long recognized as an expert on bird identification, Kenn has been teaching popular workshops on birding since 1980 and has written hundreds of ID articles forBirder's World American Birds , and other publications. A field editor for Audubon and a contributor to every major birding magazine, he has also led nature tours on all seven continents. He and his wife Kimberly make their home in northwestern Ohio.

Kim Kaufman


Kim Kaufman is Executive Director of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting sound stewardship of avian resources in the Lake Erie Marsh Region of northwest Ohio. In 2006 she started the Ohio Young Birders Club, a group for teens that has drawn national attention and inspired similar clubs in other states. She and her husband, Kenn Kaufman,  travel and teach extensively and write a popular blog about their birding adventures.

Stephen Kress


Stephen Kress is Director of the Seabird Restoration Program and Vice President for Bird Conservation of the National Audubon Society. He received his B.S. in Zoology, M.S. in Wildlife Management from Ohio State University and his Ph.D. in Environmental Education from Cornell University. Steve began Project Puffin in 1973 and has remained its director since the beginning. Steve is also the manager of National Audubon's Maine Coastal Island Sanctuaries. He was an Ornithology Instructor at the Audubon Camp in Maine on Hog Island from 1969 through 1981, and Director of the camp from 1982 through 1986. Steve is also author of many popular books on birding and backyard conservation, including The Audubon Society’sGuide to Attracting Birds: Creating Natural Habitats for Properties Large and SmallAudubon Pocket Backyard Birdwatch  and the Birder's Handbook.

John Kricher


John is a Professor of Biology at Wheaton College, Norton, Massachusetts. A graduate of Temple (B.A.) and Rutgers Universities (Ph.D.), John has conducted Earthwatch-sponsored research onmigrant birds on their wintering grounds in Belize and is the author of over 100 papers and articles in scientific journals, magazines, and newspapers. His recent book, The Balance of Nature: Ecology's Enduring Myth, was published by Princeton University Press in spring of 2009. He has also authored Galapagos: A Natural History, three Peterson field guides (Eastern Forests, Pacific Northwest, and Rocky Mountain & Southwestern Forests) and the very popular, A Neotropical Companion. The recently completed textbook, Tropical Ecology, was published by Princeton University Press in 2011. John is a Fellow in the American Ornithologists Union and has served as president of the Association of Field Ornithologists, president of the Wilson Ornithological Society, and president of the Nuttall Ornithological Club, and is currently on the Council of the Massachusetts Audubon Society. John has led trips throughout the western hemisphere. He and his wife Martha Vaughan divide their time between Pocasset, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod and Sunbury, Georgia.

Don Kroodsma


Donald Kroodsma is professor emeritus from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has studied birdsong for more than 40 years. First loves are wrens and thrushes, songbirds and flycatchers, and any bird that has a peep to offer the world. In 2003, he was awarded the Elliott Coues Award from the American Ornithologists' Union, which acknowledged him as the “reigning authority on avian vocal behavior.” Having left academics, Kroodsma now spends full time recording, writing, and sharing his passion for birdsong with others. Recent books include The Singing Life of Birds (winner of John Burroughs Medal), Birdsong by the Seasons, and the Backyard Birdsong Guides.

J. Drew Lanham Living on the Wind: Fall Migration and Monhegan Island 

J. Drew Lanham is an Alumni Distinguished Professor at Clemson University with foci in the areas of land ethics and conservation ornithology. Having birded abroad in South Africa, the Peruvian Amazon and all but seven of the US states, he teaches birding as an exercise in connecting dots- telling bird “stories” beyond identification so that each species becomes important and the mission to conserve becomes priority. His blog,, provides insight into his passion for nature. His first books, Sparrow Envy-Poems and The Home Place – Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature, will be published in 2016.

Andy Lantz - Tropical Teen Week in Costa Rica


Andy Lantz is a science teacher at Cameron Middle School in Nashville, TN. He has been teaching in middle and high school classrooms for seven years, and an additional four years in environmental education. In his years as an outdoor educator and naturalist, he has worked for Georgia 4H, MassAudubon, and The Nature Conservancy. Andy has a BA in Environmental Sciences from UMass Boston, and a MS in Science Education from Florida State University. He has been an active birder since 2005.

Yossi Leshem


Professor Yossi Leshem is Israel’s best known ornithologist with an international following among both scientists and the bird-watching community in Europe and North America. He is currently a professor in the Dept. of Zoology at Tel Aviv University. He is also the founder and director of the International Center for the Study of Bird Migration at Latrun, Israel. He is best known for his research concerning migration routes of raptors and other migrants between Europe, Asia and Africa- many of which fly over Israel. As part of this research, Yossi spent two hundred and seventy-two days using a motorized glider, flying wingtip to wingtip, with million of high flying birds. These efforts, conducted in cooperation with the Israeli Air Force, have resulted in a dramatic decrease in mid-air collisions. Yossi is also a pioneer in environmental education—first, as the director of the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel, the country’s largest non-profit organization. More recently, his migration research has become the basis for numerous educational activities in Israeli schools—also working closely with Palestinian and Jordanian educators and their students.

Chris Lewey


Chris Lewey is Executive Director and Founder of RAVEN Interpretive Programs, a provider of international tours and programs focusing on wildlife and ecology. He leads natural history tours for  the Maine Audubon Society, Smithsonian Study Tours and the National Wildlife Federation. Chris is also a naturalist for the Appalachian Mountain Club. A native New Englander and licensed Maine Guide, Chris is very much at home on the coast or in the mountains where his fascination with wildlife is always enthusiastically shared. Chris holds a masters degree in Environmental Studies from Antioch University and  has taught biology, ecology and ornithology in both New Hampshire and Maine. As a nature photographer and master bird-bander, he continues wildlife research in his region.

Sandy Lockerman - Hands-on Bird Science


Sandy Lockerman is an environmental educator and naturalist for Dauphin County Parks and Recreation at Wildwood Park in Harrisburg, PA. She is a master bird bander, having started banding in the late 1990s, focusing on northern saw-whet owls, songbirds and hummingbirds. She is a longtime site coordinator and project administrator for the Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art's owl banding program in Pennsylvania, and since 2010 has been banding both resident ruby-throated hummingbirds and vagrant western hummingbird species in the East.

Jean Mackay


Artist and educator Jean Mackay has been exploring nature and sharing its beauty and diversity with others for more than 20 years. Her watercolor illustrations and journals capture the remarkable species and ordinary things we encounter every day. Jean has been an instructor at Hog Island since 2003, exploring birds, marine life, and coastal Maine ecology with children and adults. She has an M.S. in Environmental Education from Lesley College and, when not exploring or pining for the Maine coast, she works in partnership with the National Park Service at the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor in New York. You can see her work on her blog, Drawn In, at

Stephanie Malinich - Hands-on Bird Science


Stephanie Malinich is a native Ohioan from the Lake Erie area. She graduated with a degree in evolution and ecology from The Ohio State University (OSU) in 2014. As an undergraduate, she spent a majority of her time working at the Museum of Biological Diversity’s Tetrapod Collection with the bird collection. After graduating, she spent a summer in Marlinton, WV, tracking Golden-winged Warbler breeding habits. She has since returned to the tetrapod collection as their collection manager, where she works with undergraduates and creating research study skins. When the weather is too bad to bird, Stephanie enjoys knitting and cuddling her cats, Hrothgar and Grendel. This will be her first summer at Hog Island and she is looking forward to all the new life birds and experiences.

Laura McCarthy


Laura oversees the grassroots efforts of the conservation and policy programs for Audubon New York, and also coordinates volunteers for some of Audubon’s science initiatives, working closely with the 27 Audubon chapters in NY.  For the past two years, Laura has helped lead an Audubon Chapter Leadership Camp for chapter leaders in the Atlantic Flyway on Hog Island, facilitating workshops including advocacy and media training, and how to effectively engage volunteers. Laura lives in Albany, NY where she enjoys skiing, kayaking, and hiking and she dabbles in a variety of arts and crafts, including painting, jewelry-making, and photography. Inspired by a college art class in 2003, she’s been making (and filling!) her own hand-bound sketchbooks and travel journals for years, and has recently begun teaching these bookbinding skills through small workshops with friends.

Kevin McGowan


Kevin is the instructor for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Home Study Course in Bird Biology and a new online short-course, “Courtship and Rivalry in Birds.” Kevin received a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of South Florida for work on the behavior of Florida Scrub-Jays.  He was the co-editor and primary author for the recently-published book, The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in New York State.  He also helped create the Lab of Ornithology's award-winning All About Birds website and wrote the original Bird Guide section.  He has been studying the Ithaca population of crows since 1988, and has followed the life stories of over 2,000 banded birds. An avid birder, as well as a professional ornithologist, Kevin enjoys all aspects of birds (especially crows), from behavior to physiology, and from ecology to evolution.  He is interested in spreading the appreciation of birds to all possible audiences, through all possible avenues.

Laurie McLaughlin


Laurie McLaughlin

Laurie McLaughlin is a faculty member at Penn State University and a Program Coordinator at Shaver’s Creek Environmental Center, Penn State’s Nature Center in central Pennsylvania.  Laurie teaches  facilitation and teambuilding skills, environmental education, and is the director of the Maple Harvest Festival.  Laurie earned her B.S. in Environmental Interpretation from Penn State and an M.A. in Experiential Education from the University of Colorado. In addition to helping young people learn about and enjoy the natural world, her interests include birds, the ocean, traveling, canoeing, cooking, reading, and, most of all, spending time with her husband, Mark, and their two sons, Brian and Sean.

Holly Merker - Living on the Wind: Fall Migration and Monhegan Island


Holly Merker has been in awe of birds, and the wonders of the natural world, as far back as she can remember.  She’s lucky to share her passion by connecting others to nature in her work as an environmental educator. Some of her favorite moments in the field have been as a birding instructor for the American Birding Association’s Camp Avocet for teen birders, where she shows youth birders the marvels of Delmarva’s rich bird life.  Holly has a strong interest in bird distribution, and has been the eBird state coordinator for Pennsylvania since 2005, and is a member of the Pennsylvania Ornithological Records Committee. She has participated in many avian population-monitoring projects, and is actively involved with multiple birding clubs, including one she helped start for the local elementary school. Holly’s passion for studying migration is especially alive in fall, experiencing raptor migration as a volunteer hawk counter for both Hawk Mountain Sanctuary and the Rose Tree Park Hawkwatch in Pennsylvania.

Brandee Moore - Hands-on Bird Science


Brandee Moore of Steele, Alabama, is master bander with extensive experience with passerines, hummingbirds and owls. A graduate of the University of Idaho with a degree in wildlife biology, she got hooked on banding after a class at Point Reyes Bird Observatory in California in 1997. Before long, she became a crew member with the Hummer/Bird Study Group, banding trans-Gulf migrants each spring and autumn for many years at Fort Morgan, Alabama, as well as working with ruby-throated hummingbirds during the breeding season, and western hummingbirds during fall and winter. She has trained new hummingbird banders, and with her husband Fred (also a master bander), operates a MAPS passerine station, winter saw-whet owl banding site and general songbird and hummingbird migrant banding on their 75-acre property.


Steve Morello


Steve Morello is the Director of Mondo Verde Expeditions, a wildlife tour company that specializes in wildlife expeditions and endeavors to make a positive difference in the places where they travel. His enthusiasm for sustainable tourism is matched only by his passion for conservation of wildlife through photography. Well known as a professional wildlife photographer, Steve’s work has appeared in National Geographic Magazine, National Geographic Books, National Geographic World Magazine, National Geographic Traveler, International Wildlife, The New York Times, Martha Stuart’s Living, Popular Photography, and Outdoor Photographer as well as numerous other magazines, books and calendars. Steve is a major contributor to the photo collection of the World Wildlife Fund and to-date has contributed more images to their photo library than any other photographer. Steve is the author of the acclaimed book, The Traveling Nature Photographer.

Sara Morris


Sara R. Morris is a professor of Biology and the Director of the Environmental Science Program at Canisius College in Buffalo, NY. She earned her MS and PhD in zoology at Cornell University.  Her research focus is bird migration, specifically in how birds use sites in-between where they breed and winter to successfully complete their migrations. At Canisius, Morris teaches classes in ornithology, vertebrate zoology, ecology and evolution.  She regularly takes her undergraduate research students to ornithological conferences to present their research projects and class students on extended field trips to areas like Fort Myers, FL, and the Galapagos Islands to study wildlife.   Morris is a Fellow of the American Ornithologists’ Union (AOU), the Secretary of the AOU, a council member of the Wilson Ornithological Society, and a research associate at the Buffalo Museum of Science.

Kristin Mosher


Born and raised in New York, Kristin Mosher developed a passion for wildlife and photography after working for three years as director of operations for the Jane Goodall Institute in Connecticut.  Her early work centered on documenting life histories of wild chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania.  Mosher continues to promote chimp conservation, working with her husband, cinematographer Bill Wallauer.  In 2012 she recorded audio for the Disneynature film, Chimpanzee, which won Best Sound at the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival in 2013.  See for more information.  

Katrina Murböck - Fall Seabid Conservation & Biology - Road Scholar session

Katrina Murböck is a Research Coordinator for the San Diego Zoo’s Institute for Conservation Research, where she oversees the tern and plover project at Naval Base Coronado. Her responsibilities include coordinating the monitoring process of the beach nesting habitat of the endangered California Least Tern and the threatened Western Snowy Plover. Finding and marking the nests hidden in the sand is crucial in order to protect the nests from human impacts.

Katrina graduated from Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Germany in 2006, with a bachelor’s degree in general biology. She then continued on to get her master’s in behavioral ecology at the Max-Planck-Institute for Ornithology, where she worked on nest site selection behavior and home range distribution in blue tits. Katrina has been fortunate enough to study the life history of various birds in remote locations, such as the white-winged swallow in the Amazon and the semipalmated sandpiper in the arctic tundra. Katrina joined the San Diego Zoo and the tern and plover project in 2013. Being able to contribute to the protection of these endangered species and their habitats, while also doing public outreach, is Katrina’s biggest passion.

Angelika Nelson


Angelika Nelson is curator of the Borror Laboratory of Bioacoustics and the Tetrapod collection in the Museum of Biological Diversity at The Ohio State University. She earned her MS at the University of Vienna in her home country of Austria and her PhD at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. As a behavioral ecologist her research is focused on acoustic communication in birds, recently in the white-crowned sparrow along the Pacific Northwest coast. She teaches “Introduction to Ornithology” and advises the student Ornithology club at The Ohio State University. She enjoys traveling with her husband Doug, spending time in nature, bird-watching, horseback riding and taking her dog Inga for walks.

Craig Newberger


Craig Newberger  has served as the Lower School Science Coordinator at Germantown Academy for over 25 years. During the summers he directs their Wildlife Discovery Camp, which he started in 2003. Craig has also designed and directed Germantown Academy's Summer Science Institute for Girls. He is a recipient of the "Exemplary Teacher of Elementary Science Award" from the Montgomery County Science Teachers Association. Craig directed the Audubon Youth Ecology Camp on Hog Island for seventeen summers and co-directed Audubon's Family Camp on Hog Island for four summers. Craig has worked as a naturalist at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History and he served as director for the National Environmental Education Development (N.E.E.D) residential program at the Cape Cod National Seashore. Craig is the author of over a hundred nature columns, which have appeared in many newspapers and magazine. He is also a contributor to the book, A Guide to Nature on Cape Cod and the Islands. Craig's expertise on the hammered dulcimer, banjo, and guitar has played an important role in engaging his students.

Colleen Noyes - Instructor of Family Camp Session Two


Colleen has been a Naturalist at the CT Audubon Society since 1996 and she holds a MS in Environmental Education.  She had the pleasure of changing careers and giving away her “business” clothing in exchange for boots, bugs, mud and so much more.  Twenty years later she continues to share the natural world with children and adults of all walks of life.  She is living proof that if you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life! Colleen lives in Connecticut with her two daughters Fiona and Eleanor.  Two Airedale terriers (Gus and Stella) complete the mix. In her spare time, Colleen plays guitar and sings in a band, Fiona & Friend, with her oldest daughter. Colleen has also been a wonderful Friends of Hog Island volunteer in past summers.

Wayne Petersen


Wayne is a Massachusetts native and director of the Massachusetts Important Bird Area (IBA) Program for the Massachusetts Audubon Society. Throughout his illustrious career, Wayne has lectured extensively, conducted birding workshops across North America, and led tours for Mass Audubon and Field Guides, Inc. that have taken him from arctic Canada to South America, Iceland, Svalbard, Africa, Madagascar, Antarctica, Australia, and New Zealand. A founding member of the Massachusetts Avian Records Committee (MARC), Wayne is also a New England Regional Editor for North American Birds magazine and editor for the New England Christmas Bird Counts. In addition to writing a bird identification column for thirty-five years for Bird Observer magazine, his writing projects have included writing or co-authoring the National Audubon Society Pocket Guide to Songbirds and Familiar Backyard Birds (East), Birds of Massachusetts, Birds of New England, and the Massachusetts Breeding Bird Atlas. He also contributed accounts to The Audubon Society Master Guide to Birding, The Sibley Guide to Bird Life and Behavior, and Arctic Wings. Wayne is currently a member of the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program Advisory Committee, and in 2005 he received the American Birding Association's Ludlow Griscom Award for outstanding contributions in regional ornithology. Wayne is especially interested in seabirds and shorebirds and he derives great satisfaction from sharing his knowledge of the natural world with others.

Trudy Phillips


Trudy Phillips is the Director for Environmental Education at the Perkiomen Watershed Conservancy.  Holding an M.S. in Environmental Education, Trudy has been an elementary school teacher, an Expedition Guide for the National Audubon Society’s (NAS) Expedition Institute, Assistant Director for the NAS Youth Ecology Camp and Family Camp in Maine, and the Assistant Director for Education at the Schuylkill Environmental Education Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Awards for teaching excellence include the Early Childhood Professional Award from Scholastic, Inc., the Outstanding Environmental Educator from the Pennsylvania Alliance for Environmental Education, and the Dr. Ruth Patrick Award from the Water Resources Association (WRA) of the Delaware River Basin for outstanding early childhood, youth and adult environmental education programs.

Walt Pomeroy


Walt has been an environmental advocate and volunteer leader trainer for more than four decades in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic states. He was the Mid-Atlantic Regional Vice President for National Audubon for 17 years and Chapter Services Director during part of that time. He was on the organizing and planning team for 8 Audubon National Conventions and he and his regional staff organized 9 regional conferences and leadership training sessions. During countless state Audubon Council meetings, Walt organized and participated in a wide diversity of leadership training workshops. In 1995 he and his Mid-Atlantic staff and chapter volunteers organized the first and pilot state Important Bird Areas program in the country. Walt has led a dozen Audubon Nature Odyssey trips around the world and traveled in all fifty states, Canada and to over 30 countries. Now retired, Walt is on the Audubon-Pennsylvania Board, the Friends of Hog Island (FOHI) Advisory Board and the Listening Point Foundation Advisory Board. He and his wife were Hog Island campers in 1981.

Joshua Potter


Joshua Potter is the Marketing Coordinator and a naturalist at Shaver's Creek Environmental Center in Central PA. He received his BA degree from Penn State in Integrative Arts, blending multimedia and environmental education. He has recently moved back to Pennsylvania with his wife Sarah, son Ellory, and daughter Lucy. Previously Joshua worked as a naturalist and Outreach Coordinator for Tin Mountain Conservation Center in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Joshua spent his summers at Tin Mountain as director of their backpacking and canoeing camps for teens, where he strived to inject natural history into each day on the trail or water.

John Pumilio


John first stepped on Hog Island in the early 1990's as a student assistant.  By 1993, he had become one of the youngest camp instructors in Hog Island's history at age 21.  During this time, John conducted several annual breeding bird surveys of the island carrying on the historic work of Allan D. Cruickshank.  Since his early days at Hog Island, John gained extensive national and international guiding experience including environmental sustainability work in Alaska, the Florida Everglades, Canadian Rockies, Tanzania, Galapagos Islands, Machu Picchu, and Patagonia, Chile among other places.  While in the Everglades, John was a field biologist on the Red-cockaded woodpecker and Florida panther recovery projects.  He also spent time in the West Indies researching avian biodiversity and persistence in different habitats.  Currently, John is the Director of Sustainability at Colgate University in Central New York.  He received his bachelor's degree in environmental and forest biology from ESF at Syracuse University and graduate degree from The Evergreen State College in Washington State.  John is thrilled to return to Hog Island and looks forward to sharing his knowledge and passion of coastal Maine's birds with others.

Heather Richard


Heather is an educator and graduate student in Marine Science at San Francisco State University's Romberg Tiburon Center. As a native Mainer, she has always had a strong connection to the outdoors, and as a Student Assistant on Hog Island in 2003 she developed a passion for sharing her connection to the outdoors with others. She graduated with a B.S. in Biology from Clark University and served as an education intern for Project Puffin in 2005. With nearly 10 years of experience in outdoor education, her experiences include backpacking with students in West Virginia, snorkeling with school groups on Catalina Island in California, and leading public trips out to the Farallon Islands in search of whales and seabirds. By far, she feels most at home living by the tides on islands such as Hog Island where she has specialized in teaching marine science since her time as a Student Assistant. She feels fortunate to have made her passion her career, and is also an avid biker, explorer, artist and musician.

Anne Rosenberg


Anne is the Coordinator for Youth Education and Outreach for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. She has designed and led numerous children's classes and activities, and works with a variety of formal and informal educators to deliver environmental education programming. In particular, Anne is interested in activities that combine art and nature to foster inquiry-based learning. Anne earned a BS in animal ecology from University of California, Berkeley and a MS in plant community ecology from Tulane University. She has been a member of the Education Department at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology for 16 years, during which she helped to develop several educational web sites and curricula.

Cyndi Routledge - Hands-on Bird Science


Cyndi Routledge, a native of New Jersey, currently resides in Tennessee where she is the founder of Southeastern Avian Research, a non-profit group that promotes the conservation and preservation of hummingbirds and neotropical migrants through scientific research and education.  Cyndi holds a master banding permit for passerines, near-passerines and hummingbirds.  She currently leads the banding efforts for three hummingbird festivals in Tennessee and Mississippi, coordinates a MAPS station and developed and distributes a “Discover Birds Activity Book” for children.  Cyndi is a Tennessee Naturalist, photographer, avid birder, secretary of the Tennessee Ornithological Society, president of the Nashville Tennessee Ornithological Society, past president of the Clarksville-Warioto Audubon Chapter, member of the Hummer Bird Study Group and a facilitator for Project Wet, Project Wild and Project Learning Tree in Tennessee.  This is Cyndi’s first summer on Hog Island and she’s very much looking forward to the experience as well as meeting and working with everyone.


Pete Salmansohn


Pete Salmansohn received his M.S. in Teaching from the Environmental Studies Department at Antioch/New England and his M.S. in Social Ecology from Goddard College. He has been an instructor at Hog Island during adult, family, and youth camps since 1980, and is the Program Director for this year’s Sharing Nature program for educators. Pete is the Education Coordinator for the Seabird Restoration Program and created our school outreach program in Maine about seabird conservation, which is now in its 14th year. Pete coordinates the Audubon seabird tours aboard commercial boats each summer.   He  co-authored, with Steve Kress, Project Puffin: How We Brought the Puffins Back to Eastern Egg RockGiving Back To The Earth and Saving Birds: Heroes Around the World.

Susan Schubel


"Seabird Sue" Schubel is Project Puffin's own Disney Hero , and has been the Outreach Educator for Project Puffin since 2000. She loves to engage her students in exciting learning activities and share real data from the seabird islands with them. Her acquaintance with Project Puffin began in high school, when she saw Marlin Perkins rowing ashore with Steve on Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom episode Return of the Puffin. She started working with Project Puffin as a volunteer on Matinicus Rock in 1984, and since then has spent many summers on islands in Maine,California and the Galapagos. Sue loves islands and beasts, and recently acquired a dog with very familiar little black triangles over its eyes.

Jerry Skinner


Jerry is a professor of biology at Keystone College, an educator for the Keystone College Environmental Education Institute, and the resident naturalist and volunteer steward at the Nature Conservancy’s Woodbourne Forest and Wildlife Sanctuary in Susquehanna County, PA. Jerry  began as an instructor at Hog Island in 1981 and finds every excuse he can to get back.  He spent several years with Project Puffin working in the Galapagos and closer to home on Stratton Island, Maine. At home in Pennsylvania, he was a regional coordinator and species account author for the 2nd Pennsylvania Breeding Bird Atlas.

Ron Smith


Ron is an environmental science educator from Merchantville, NJ where he teaches K-12 environmental science in the Haddonfield School District.. His programs and classes emphasize citizen science, field studies and ecological restoration. In the summer Ron leads the Life Science Field Training Institute for Pinelands Preservation Alliance – a program that offers teacher training and experience with field study techniques in the NJ Pine Barrens and regional coastal ecosystems. Ron has collaborated on science education projects with the Academy of Natural Sciences, Pinelands Preservation Alliance, Camden County Parks, Drexel University and Stockton College. Ron enjoys Irish fiddle, hiking, birding and exploring the natural world with his wife Lisa, children Lily and Gabriel and dog Linus.

Iain Stenhouse


Iain Stenhouse is the Director of the Marine Bird Program for the BioDiversity Research Institute, based in Gorham, Maine, a non-profit organization working internationally to advance the conservation of wildlife. After receiving his Ph.D. in Cognitive & Behavioral Ecology from Memorial University of Newfoundland, Iain worked for the National Audubon Society. As the Director of Bird Conservation for Audubon Alaska, he completed the first state-wide assessment of significant sites for bird conservation, and produced the second edition of the Alaska WatchList . As Senior Scientist for the Important Bird Areas (IBA) Program, Iain developed Audubon’s approach to monitoring and assessment of IBAs. He has authored or co-authored many scientific papers, technical reports, book chapters, and popular articles on marine bird ecology and conservation. Recently, Iain’s work has focused largely on the migration and movements of marine birds at sea, using satellite transmitters and other tracking technologies, such as geo-locators. In collaboration with a Danish colleague, he tracked Arctic Terns from their breeding grounds in N ortheast Greenland to their wintering areas in Antarctica and back again – the longest animal migration ever recorded.

Nina Stoyan-Rozenzweig


 Trained as a wildlife biologist and ecologist, writing instructor, and historian, Nina is currently on the faculty of the UF Health Science Center Libraries, where she directs medical humanities programming in the UF College of Medicine. She teaches history of medicine, reflective writing and narrative medicine, nature and healing, environmental health, and medical humanities in the College of Medicine. Her undergraduate courses include one on Harry Potter, arts and health in Sub-Saharan Africa and sustainability. She collaborates with the UF museum of art, arts in medicine program, and Wilmot Healing Gardens. Nina first came to Hog Island in 1984 as an intern with Project Puffin. She is currently completing her Ph.D. in History from the University of Michigan. Nina’s research interests include environmental history, the history of the human-animal relationship, and the history of science and medicine.

Barbara Sullivan-Watts - Spring Seabird Biology and Conservation


Barbara Sullivan-Watts currently teaches Environmental Biology at Providence College, RI following a 28 year career in oceanographic research at the University of Rhode Island. She received her M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and Ph.D. in Oceanography from Oregon State University.  Her research focused on the changes in marine plankton food webs of Narragansett Bay  and Georges Bank caused by pollution and over-fishing . She has also shared this knowledge and appreciation of scientific research with K-8th grade teachers for 20 years as a Co-Director and board member of GEMS-Net, a partnership among URI’s School of Education, scientists and public school districts. After attending Steve Kress’s Seabird Conservation Program at Hog Island in 2015 she was delighted to find that her expertise in marine plankton would be a welcome addition to the marine life studies at Hog Island. The seabirds know well enough the significance of the base of the marine food web – plankton – that support the fish that feed the birds!  She thinks plankton are wonderful creatures to look at and learn about for their own right, but that knowing about their ultimate importance to birds will makes them all the more fascinating to campers at Hog Island.

Clay Sutton


Clay Sutton is a life-long resident of Cape May, where he has worked as an environmental planner, environmental program administrator, vice-president of an environmental consulting firm specializing in threatened and endangered species, and as a self-employed environmental consultant, naturalist and field biologist. Clay is a writer, lecturer, and was a long-time instructor for the American Birding Association's Institute for Field Ornithology. Clay is a co-author, with Pete Dunne and David Sibley, of the classic Hawks in Flight, and Clay and his wife Pat have co-authored How to Spot ButterfliesHow to Spot Hawks & Eagles, and How to Spot an Owl, all published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Their latest book, Birds and Birding at Cape May, is the in-depth result of their efforts over many years documenting and protecting the migration and the Cape May area that they so love. This landmark book is a complete guide to birds and birding for the Cape May region, covering what to see, when, where, and how to go, as well as the storied ornithological history of the Cape. For more information go to Pat and Clay's

Pat Sutton


Pat Sutton has studied the natural world for over 30 years, first as the naturalist at the Cape May Point State Park in the 1970s and 1980s and then for 21 years as the naturalist and program director at New Jersey Audubon's Cape May Bird Observatory (1986 to 2007). She and her husband (Clay Sutton) wrote the landmark book, Birds and Birding at Cape May, the in-depth result of their efforts over many years documenting and protecting the migration and the Cape May area that they so love. Other books by Pat and Clay include How to Spot ButterfliesHow to Spot Hawks & Eagles, and How to Spot an Owl. Today Pat is a free-lance writer, photographer, naturalist, educator, lecturer, tour leader, and wildlife garden consultant. Sutton's own wildlife garden is a "teaching garden" featured in programs and workshops she teaches and is included on many tours, including tours of private wildlife gardens that she has led for twenty-one years. For more information go to Pat and Clay's website:

Bill Thompson III


Bill Thompson III is the editor/co-publisher of Bird Watcher's Digest, America's longest-running magazine for birders. He's the author of numerous books on birds, including Bird Watching For Dummies, Identify Yourself: The 50 Most Common Bird Identification ChallengesIdentifying & Feeding Birdsand the forthcoming Young Birder's Guide to Birds of North America.  He writes a weekly blog, Bill of the Birds and hosts a podcast called This Birding LifeBill regularly speaks, guides, and performs at birding festivals across North America and consults internationally on ecotourism marketing. He has watched birds in 47 US states and in 28 countries. In his spare time he's the leader of the country-rock band The Rain Crows.

Peter Vickery


Peter Vickery is President of the Center for Ecological Research, a non-profit company focused on conservation research. He is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  Peter’s research interests include habitat selection and breeding ecology of grassland birds, conservation planning on landscape and regional scales, and international conservation. He has a special interest in developing conservation strategies for species and ecosystems before they become endangered. He is writing a book on Maine Birds with Bill Sheehan and is collaborating on grassland bird research in Argentina.  Recent projects have included regional grassland bird conservation strategies in New England and the reproductive biology of the Northern Blazing Star, a rare grassland forb. Peter is co-author of A Birder’s Guide to Maine with Elizabeth Pierson and Jan Pierson.  He has also consulted on wind power and hydro-kinetics projects in Maine.  He loves being outdoors in Maine.

Bill Wallauer


For 15 years, Bill spent just about every day following the chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, capturing the intimate details of their daily life. He has served as a camera operator and scientific advisor for more than 30 productions, including BBC/Animal Planet's "Chimp Week" and BBC/Discovery's 10-part series, "Planet Earth." Most recently he worked as principal photography for Disneynature's "Chimpanzee."  

Brad Walker - Hands-on Bird Science


Brad Walker graduated from Cornell University in 2009 with a degree in Ecology and Evolutionary biology. After graduation, he worked as a field assistant in Churchill, MB studying Hudsonian Godwits and the llanos of Venezuela tracking Green-rumped Parrotlets. He has since returned to Cornell University to work at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology as an archivist with the Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds and Video. When he's not out in the field working on his eBird lists, he volunteers at the Cornell Museum of Vertebrates preparing bird specimens. This is his first time visiting Hog Island and he looks forward to every minute of it!


Scott Weidensaul


Author and naturalist Scott Weidensaul has written more than two dozen books on natural history, including Living on the Wind: Across the Hemisphere with Migratory Birds  (a Pulitzer Prize finalist), The Ghost with Trembling Wings and Of a Feather: A Brief History of American Birding. His next book, The First Frontier: The Forgotten History of Struggle, Savagery, and Endurance in Early America, is due out in the spring of 2012. Scott’s writing has appeared in publications including Smithsonian, the New York Times Nature ConservancyNational Wildlife and Audubon . He lectures widely on wildlife and environmental topics and is an active field researcher, specializing in birds of prey and hummingbirds. Scott lives in the Appalachians of eastern Pennsylvania.

Jeff Wells


Jeff  Wells is the Senior Scientist for the International Boreal Conservation Campaign and the Boreal Songbird Initiative, organizations working internationally for the conservation of North America's Boreal forest. After receiving his Ph.D. and Master's degrees in ecology from Cornell University, Jeff worked for the National Audubon Society as the New York State and later National Bird Conservation Director. During his tenure with Audubon, Jeff was located at Cornell University, where he continues as a Visiting Fellow of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. He has authored or co-authored many scientific papers, reports, books, and popular articles on ecology and conservation topics including the book, Birder’s Conservation Handbook: 100 North American Birds at Risk. Jeff’s work now focuses on conservation of the largest remaining wilderness area in North America, Canada’s boreal forest, through advocating for establishment of large, multi-million acre protected areas.

Doug Wentzel - Coastal Maine Bird Studies for Teens


Doug Wentzel is a program director, instructor and naturalist at Shaver¹s Creek Environmental Centerin central PA. For nearly 20 years he has directed educational internships, summer camps and birding programs. As a Penn State instructor, Doug teaches natural history interpretation and is a certified trainer through the National Association for Interpretation. Since 2005, Doug has co-led with Laurie McLaughlin the Coastal Maine Bird Studies for Teens week. He has a BS degree in Wildlife Biology from Penn State, and has served four years in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. He and his wife Susan are raising their two sons, Dylan and Duncan, in Ennisville, PA. Doug's ongoing passion is to foster the awareness of the diversity of life in our own backyards.

Ben Wurst - Family Camp Session Two


Ben Wurst has worked to monitor and manage endangered wildlife including ospreys, peregrine falcons, bald eagles, and northern diamondback terrapins in New Jersey since 2004. He received a B.S. in Environmental Science with emphasis in Wildlife Conservation from Unity College in 2004. He has worked full time, as the Habitat Program Manager, for Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ since 2008. With his duties at CWF, he has come to embrace information technology to help raise awareness for rare wildlife and has installed several wildlife focused cameras that stream live on the internet. Outside of work, Ben enjoys spending quality time with his wife and two children, Kaitlin and Reed (ages 4 and 5). He especially enjoys spending time outdoors while tracking down interesting subjects to capture with his photography. Ben also enjoys woodworking and collects salvaged wood that he uses to create reclaimed wood picture frames and other artwork with his small business, reclaimed LLC. He goes above and beyond to reduce his impact on the environment and is not afraid to jump into a dumpster! 

Paul Winter


Soprano saxophonist [doc:225241|link:Paul Winter] is one of the pioneers of world music. In addition to combining elements of African, Asian, Latin, and Russian music with American jazz, Winter was one of the first to incorporate the sounds of nature and wildlife into his compositions. The sounds of nature fascinated Winter, who first heard the songs of humpback whale in 1968, and was beguiled by their poignant and complex vocalizations. The famed Paul Winter Consort combined the sounds of whales, wolves, and birds with their acoustic improvisations on their recording, Common Ground, the first album to blend musical influences from around the globe with voices from nature. Recognized worldwide for his music, he is the winner of seven Grammy® Awards. For more about Paul Winter, click HERE.

Ruth Woodall


Ruth retired to Florida in December 2004.  She came from a farm background in Indiana and began a career of merchandising grain (corn, wheat and soybeans) for Indiana Grain, a division of the Indiana Farm Bureau in Indianapolis.  While based in Indianapolis she volunteered as a docent at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Ruth has been an avid birder since the late 1990s. She is actively involved in the Caloosa Bird Club of Fort Myers and is a volunteer with the Lee County Conservation 20/20 Program as a member of the Bird Patrol, as well as a volunteer for the Estero Bay Aquatic Preserve rookery monitoring. She first came to Hog Island as a camper for the Maine Seabird Biology and Conservation Program in 2010 and has been returning in various capacities ever since.  This summer she will be the Program Coordinator for all the July camps

Sherrie York


Sherrie York is an accomplished artist with an international reputation for lyrical and expressive works on paper. Her fine art exhibitions primarily feature relief linocuts and she is currently expanding to include artist books based on her long practice of keeping illustrated journals and field sketchbooks. For the past ten years Sherrie has been the lead illustrator for Audubon Adventures, as well as writer and designer of the program’s Natural Journaling for Everyone packet. She provides illustrations and teaches workshops for a wide variety of conservation organizations and has been an invited artist on international expeditions of the Artists for Nature Foundation. Her original relief prints, watercolor paintings, and more can be seen on her website.

Julie Zickefoose


Julie Zickefoose started off as an illustrator of natural history subjects as a college freshman in 1976. A six-year stint as a field biologist with The Nature Conservancy's Connecticut Chapter proved a strong motivator both to learn more about ecosystems and to go back to drawing. Along the way, she began to write her own essays, studded with observations of birds and animals, and writing slowly crept into the forefront of her interests. Bird Watcher’s Digest has been the major print venue for her writing since 1986, and she’s painted 21 covers for the magazine. In 2006 her first book of illustrated essays, Letters from Eden was published. She contributed natural history commentaries to National Public Radio’s All Things Considered from 2005-2010. Julie Zickefoose on Blogspot entertains around 19,000 visits per month. Her new book, The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds With Common Birdswill be published in early spring 2012.  Julie and her family (Bill Thompson III, Phoebe, Liam and Boston terrier Chet Baker) live in a ranch house topped by a 42 foot tall birdwatching tower. She and Bill perform in a band called The Rain Crows. With a dozen species of breeding warblers and more gardens than any one person should probably try to take care of, Indigo Hill has everything Julie needs to keep writing and drawing for a very long time.

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